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One Thing At a Time

| March 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

I work in communications and marketing, where “the ability to multi-task” is part of the job description. There is definitely the need to jump from task to task quickly and become more efficient in time management. I’ve always found, however, that if I’m jumping around too much it can really increase the time necessary to finish one task because I wasn’t able to fully focus on it for long enough periods of time.   

I learned to restructure my day, setting aside the first part of the morning to attack those tasks that require immediate attention, and deal with them one at a time. I ignore the emails, the phone messages, and any knocks at my door. The traffic began to subside as people began to realize that I didn’t have “office hours” until about 10:30 a.m. each day.  

By allowing myself the time to focus on these tasks one at a time, I found I could easily take care of them in less time, and the rest of my day could be spent putting out fires or jumping around as needed (great exercise!).

It’s not 100% foolproof, but I have found it has helped me become more organized  – and most people (and employers) like that!

- Sharon Warren

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Sharon Warren is a Marketing/Communications professional from Totonto, Canada, with more than 10 years experience in the entertainment industry. She can be reached at  sharon.m.warren@gmail.com.

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Thanks to Sharon Warren, who recently shared her story in our upcoming Lessons From Organizing book. To share your best organizing story, lesson or tip for Lessons From Organizing click here.

 

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